La asociación Amics de la UAB premia al ICTA-UAB

El ICTA-UAB recibirá uno de los premios que la asociación Amics de la UAB entrega cada año en el marco de la Festa Amics UAB.

Iron availability in seawater, key to explaining the amount and distribution of fish in the oceans

People tend to pay more attention to how much food they are eating, than with how rich their diet is in essential micronutrients like iron.

Mining waste dumped into Portmán Bay continues to release metals into the sea 25 years later

The waters of the Mediterranean Sea continue to receive dissolved metals from the mining waste deposited in Portmán Bay (Murcia) 25 years after the cessation of mining activity.

A new ICTA-UAB project to assess the impacts of micro- and nano-plastics in the tropical and temperate oceans

A new project led by ICTA-UAB researcher Patrizia Ziveri is one of five projects selected for funding by the Joint Programming Initiative Healthy and Productive Seas and Oceans (JPI Oceans).

Big data reveals extraordinary unity underlying life’s diversity

Limits to growth lie at the heart of how all living things function, according to a new study carried out by ICTA-UAB researchers  .

Jeroen van den Bergh, awarded an honorary doctorate by the Open University of the Netherlands

The environmental economist at ICTA-UAB Prof. Dr Jeroen van den Bergh was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Open University of the Netherlands.

Paris Agreement hampered by inconsistent pledges, new ICTA-UAB research finds

Some countries' Paris Climate Agreement pledges may not be as ambitious as they appear, according a new study carried out by researchers from the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB).

High lead concentrations found in Amazonian wildlife

Researchers from ICTA-UAB and the UVic-UCC detect high levels of lead concentration in wildlife samples from the Peruvian Amazon caused by lead-based ammunition and oil-related pollution in extraction areas.

Study gauges trees’ potential to slow global warming in the future

The Pyrenean forests, the Cantabrian coast and Galicia show an important potential to accumulate even larger amounts of carbon dioxide in the future and thus help to slow down the increase in CO2 concentrations which are warming the planet.

Why do environmentalists eat meat?

A study by researchers at the ICTA-UAB analyses the reasons why environmentally-minded scientists find it difficult to give up meat consumption, one of the world's greatest environmental problems.

La gestión del verde urbano permite incrementar la presencia de pájaros en las ciudades

Incrementar la biodiversidad del verde urbano permitiría aumentar la presencia de aves paseriformes en las ciudades mediterráneas, según un estudio científico realizado por investigadores del Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología Ambientales de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) que analiza qué estrategias hay que implementar sobre la vegetación urbana para conseguir "naturalizar" las ciudades favoreciendo la entrada de flora y fauna.

The Ebro River annually dumps 2.2 billion microplastics into the sea

An ICTA-UAB study analyses the distribution and accumulation of microplastics from one of the main rivers of the western Mediterranean.

European project to support rooftop greenhouses projects

The Institute of Environmental Science and Technology from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) is launching an open call to support rooftop greenhouse projects, in the framework of GROOF Project.

El ICTA-UAB participa en el proyecto que habilitará 10 escuelas de Barcelona como refugios climáticos

El Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología Ambientales de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) es una de las instituciones impulsoras de un proyecto que habilitará 10 escuelas de Barcelona como refugios climáticos para disminuir el impacto de las altas temperaturas del verano.

New study dismisses green growth policies as a route out of ecological emergency

Researchers from ICTA-UAB and the Goldsmiths University of London suggest that emissions reduction is only compatible with a lower economical degrowth or a degrowth scenario.
About us
The ICTA-UAB's building, an emblematic construction

Located at the southern entrance to the UAB campus, the headquarters of ICTA-ICP has a surface area of 9,400 square metres distributed on 6 floors, four of which are equipped with offices, laboratories and common areas, one with a car park and another with several storage areas, including a large warehouse with fossils and a greenhouse. The construction cost 8 million euros and was co-financed by European funds for regional development projects (2007-2013 FEDER programme of Catalonia) and the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness.

The new offices for ICTA and ICP were designed with the highest possible criteria of sustainability by two architecture groups, dataAE and H Arquitectes. The objective was clearly focused on sustainability regarding water and energy consumption, as well as the building materials used. The building achieved a LEED GOLD certification by the US Green Building Council, with a score of 73 points. The certification is based on international standards and awarded to those with a strong commitment to the environment.

Heat in the Winter and Cooling in the Summer

The building consists mainly of offices and laboratories which, given their activities, tend to generate heat. The building's design aims to make use of this heat in the winter and disperse it during the summer through natural ventilation. Four inner courtyards make up a large central atrium which guarantees an optimal quality of natural light for all the plants. A concrete structure with high thermal inertia works directly together with the passive comfort systems of the building.

A Bioclimatic Outer Skin

The outer façade of the building contains a “bioclimatic skin”, a system comparable to a greenhouse which regulates the storage of solar radiation and ventilation through a series of automatic openings and closings. Its outer skin opens and closes automatically depending on the temperature, humidity, wind or sunlight, in order to offer the best bioclimatic conditions inside the building at all times. Thus, an intermediate area with temperatures between 16 and 30ºC is created, and this acts as a thermal cushion which helps to maintain a temperature of comfort in the working areas. At the same time, it reduces energy demands and improves temperatures inside in a completely natural way. These areas are equipped with the most adequate plants for each space, and therefore favour the presence of nature inside the building, while helping to regulate humidity.

The working areas are found inside this area, with an improved climate thanks to the isolation of closed structures, comparable to large "wooden boxes", which contribute to providing conditions of comfort.

The building's control system has been programmed so that the bioclimatic skin, office windows, and all active climate controls work in coordination to prioritise a passive performance system and minimise the use of non-renewable energies. A complex automated computer control system processes and manages data to ensure the best levels of comfort and energy usage. The building makes use of all contact existing between its two underground stories and the earth as a preliminary stage for the building's air renovation, through geothermal systems which take advantage of underground temperatures. It will also give support to the passive systems at specific times, thanks to a cooling machine with high efficiency magnetic levitation compressors. Thanks to these elements, the building was certified as being in the A category of energy efficiency, with up to 62% less consumption than what is needed to run a conventional building of similar dimensions.

A 90% Reduction in Water Consumption

The building takes into account the full cycle of water usage in order to optimise consumption needs based on the reuse of rainwater and white, grey and black waters. By doing so, there is a 90% reduction in the water consumption needed for a conventional building of similar dimensions. Highly efficient elements have been installed, such as dry urinals, low-capacity toilets, tap aerators and sensors, and water-wise landscaping. Rainwater is gathered from the roof of the building, the cemented areas and the adjoining building: one part will be for irrigation and the rest will be filtered and disinfected, and later used for dishwashers and toilets. Grey waters will be regenerated and used for flushing. Wastewater will be treated through phyto-purification and the solid part will be used as compost.

Reduction in the Environmental Impact of Construction Materials

With the aim of reducing the amount of construction materials used, no false ceilings or technical floors were installed, and constructive solutions and materials with lower ecological baggage were put to use, thereby lowering energy consumption and emissions both when constructing the building and producing waste. Materials were chosen with mineral structures containing high thermal inertia and a long useful life, combined with materials of low environmental impact. Importance was given to organic or recycled materials and reversible and reusable dry construction systems. The earth dug up was later used around the building, thus making use of the area's resources.

Video of the ICTA-UAB Building (4m 20s) (in Catalan)

Photos of the ICTA-UAB Building
ICTA-UAB Building: Outer façade ICTA-UAB Building: Interior spaces (1) ICTA-UAB Building: Interior spaces (2)
ICTA-UAB Building: Resting area ICTA-UAB Building: Greenhouse ICTA-UAB Building: Research Labs
ICTA-UAB Building: Greenhouse ICTA-UAB Building: Ouside view ICTA-UAB Building: Aerial view
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