Why do environmentalists eat meat?

A study by researchers at the ICTA-UAB analyses the reasons why environmentally-minded scientists find it difficult to give up meat consumption, one of the world's greatest environmental problems.

La gestión del verde urbano permite incrementar la presencia de pájaros en las ciudades

Incrementar la biodiversidad del verde urbano permitiría aumentar la presencia de aves paseriformes en las ciudades mediterráneas, según un estudio científico realizado por investigadores del Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología Ambientales de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) que analiza qué estrategias hay que implementar sobre la vegetación urbana para conseguir "naturalizar" las ciudades favoreciendo la entrada de flora y fauna.

The Ebro River annually dumps 2.2 billion microplastics into the sea

An ICTA-UAB study analyses the distribution and accumulation of microplastics from one of the main rivers of the western Mediterranean.

European project to support rooftop greenhouses projects

The Institute of Environmental Science and Technology from the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) is launching an open call to support rooftop greenhouse projects, in the framework of GROOF Project.

El ICTA-UAB participa en el proyecto que habilitará 10 escuelas de Barcelona como refugios climáticos

El Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología Ambientales de la Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) es una de las instituciones impulsoras de un proyecto que habilitará 10 escuelas de Barcelona como refugios climáticos para disminuir el impacto de las altas temperaturas del verano.

A warmer ocean will lead to 17% reduction in global marine animal biomass, by the end of the century

Climate change will affect the distribution and abundance of marine life, but the full extent of these changes under future warming has been difficult to predict due to the limitations of individual ecosystem models used for such forecasts.

New study dismisses green growth policies as a route out of ecological emergency

Researchers from ICTA-UAB and the Goldsmiths University of London suggest that emissions reduction is only compatible with a lower economical degrowth or a degrowth scenario.

New cross-boundary approach for addressing wicked weed problems

Weed species continue to spread and management costs continue to mount, in spite of best management practices and efforts by research and extension personnel who promote them to land managers.

Urban green spaces do not benefit the health of all

In general, the creation of parks and green spaces in urban centers has positive effects on the health of city residents.

ICTA-UAB researcher Antoni Rosell-Melé receives an ERC Advanced Grant

ICTA-UAB researcher Antoni Rosell-Melé has been awarded an Advanced Grant (AdvGr) from the European Research Council (ERC) to develop the project "New geochemical approach to reconstruct tropical palaeo-atmospheric dynamics" (PALADYN).

Urban Agriculture on Rooftops Provides Healthy, Fresh and Sustainable Food

​The implementation of urban gardens on building rooftops could produce fresh, healthy and sustainable agricultural food and guarantee the food sovereignty of cities, which are becoming increasingly populated.

Indigenous knowledge, key to a successful ecosystem restoration

Ecological restoration projects actively involving indigenous peoples and local communities are more successful. This is the result of a study carried out by the Institute of Environmental Science and Technology at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB).

Future changes in human well-being more likely to depend on Social Factors than Economic Factors

The changes in the perception of personal well-being that could take place in the next three decades, on a global level, depend much more on social factors than on economic ones.

Success at ICTA-UAB: Six ERC Grants In Three Years

The Institute of Environmental Science and Technology of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (ICTA-UAB) has been awarded six European Research Council (ERC) grants in three years, from the end of 2015 to the end of 2018. Each project (of between 1.5 and 2 million euros) lasts for five years and allows the recruitment of a team of six or seven doctoral students and postdocs.
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Isabelle Anguelovski
Isabelle Anguelovski

I am an ICREA Research Professor trained in urban and environmental planning (PhD, MIT, 2011). My research is situated at the intersection of urban planning and policy, social inequality, and development studies. I also graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Political Studies from Science Po Lille (2000) and obtained a Master’s in International Development at the Université de Paris-1 Sorbonne (2001). In addition, I pursued a Graduate Certificate in Nonprofit Management at Harvard University (2004). I attempt to make my research meaningful for and engaged with local environmental justice activists and municipalities. Before starting my PhD in 2006, I held several positions in international development NGOs. I also spent 10 years in the United States (Boston) before returning to Europe in 2011 with a Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowship. 

I am currently the coordinator of the research line "Cities and Environmental Justice" and direct the ERC-funded project GREENLULUS (June 2016- May 2021). I also direct the Barcelona Lab for Urban Environmental Justice and Sustainability, a groundbreaking research laboratory carrying comparative and interdisciplinary research, developing new teaching methods and courses, and promoting learning on justice and inclusion for planning sustainable, green, and healthy cities. I am based at IMIM, the Hospital del Mar Institute for Medical Research, where I also lead the research group "Healthy Cities and Environmental Justice." Among others,  I am one of the initiators of POLLEN, the umbrella organization of political ecology researchers, groups, projects, networks, and "nodes" across the globe

 

Research interests

Most of my research is centered on studying processes and dynamics that lead to more just, resilient, healthy, and sustainable cities, bringing together theory from urban planning, public policy, urban and environmental sociology, and urban geography.  My projects examine the extent to which urban plans and policy decisions contribute to more just, resilient, healthy, and sustainable cities, and how community groups in distressed neighborhoods contest the existence, creation, or exacerbation of environmental inequities as a result of urban (re)development processes and policies.

My current research in divided in three streams. First, I examine processes of environmental gentrification in formerly depressed neighborhoods and the ways in which such processes pose new challenges and paradoxes for community residents and environmental justice activists, and seem to transform them into new forms of locally unwanted land uses (LULUs).

Second, in collaboration with researchers from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at MIT, colleagues from the Department of Human Geography, Planning and International Development at the University of Amsterdam and from the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA, and students at ICTA, I explore the variety of approaches that cities engaged in adaptation planning take to protect the lives, housing, and livelihoods of historically marginalized groups exposed to climate risks and impacts. This research specifically looks at how municipalities approach issues of socio-spatial vulnerability, adaptive capacity, inclusion, equity, and resilience. Particular attention is paid to the equity impacts of land use planning interventions for climate adaptation.

Last, I am engaged as UAB-PI in a collaborative H2020 European project NATURVATION, which takes a transdisciplinary, internationally comparative approach to 1) advance assessment approaches to capturing the mutiple impacts and values of Nature-Based Solutions (NBS) in cities to deliver a robust evidence base for decision-making, 2) enable innovation to identify the most promising governance, business/finance, and participation models and overcome the systemic conditions that currently limit their use to support systemic integration, and 3) generate momentum to realize the potential of NBS through co-design, co-development, and co-implementation of new partnerships, knowledge, recommendations, processes and tools required to build capacity, enable replication, and foster cultural change. 

Key Words

  • Comparative urban planning.
  • Environmental policy and planning.
  • Urban environmental and spatial justice.
  • Environmental gentrification
  • Political economy of urban development and sustainability planning
  • The re-politicization of sustainability.
  • Environmental and social movements.
  • Vulnerability and resilience in climate adaptation planning.
  • Food justice and sustainable urban food systems.
  • Healthy cities and healthy communities

Curriculum Vitae

Isabelle Anguelovski
Email UAB: Isabelle.Anguelovski@uab.cat
ICTA Office: Z/122
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